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November 22, 2016

Dog that travelled a long distance

Filed under: Uncategorized — neosurya @ 23:06

A few months ago, I think around May, I was dropping my kids at their school. I saw a battered pup on the street close to their campus. The dog was bleeding from its mouth, and was almost certainly going to be killed.

I picked it up, decided that that I will feed it, get it healthy, give it some shots. The plan was to take it to our farmhouse after it became strong enough. Around June, I dropped the dog at our farm house. But found out within a week that it had ran off.

On Sept 7th, the dog showed up at our house. It had traveled a long distance to be back with us :). I still think I should give it up for adoption to someone who can take better care of it. I had trained it to bring a ball, stay outside the house during day time. Respond to sit, stop and go. With my work related travel, I have very little time to take care of it. Kids are also too young to be responsible for it :-/.

But yes, I was impressed with the commitment and love of the little mutt. 🙂

November 1, 2016

Education vs Vocation vs Job

Filed under: Uncategorized — neosurya @ 15:05

A very interesting article on the Atlantic, original link here, and excerpt here:

At a recent conference, I listened to a university president boast about a program she had developed in partnership with several local high schools. She told the story of one teenager who lived in a rural area and worked full time on his family’s farm in addition to attending high school. The university president explained that the young man had little promise for attending college because of his circumstances. But through the dual-credit program, he was able to gain college credit while still in high school, which gave him the confidence to seek an associate’s degree in agriculture and return home to work on his family farm. I listened as she proudly told this young man’s story and the audience cheered for both of them, and all I could think was: What an extraordinary waste of time.

Many students these days spend 16+ years in a class room with little knowledge of their capacities. Worse, it even makes them believe that their likes, dislikes, and success metrics need to be consistent with some hard coded social rules. There is too much conditioning and too little learning. Schools and even jobs these days do not allow self-discovery, a trait that singularly separates us from animals.

Contrast the above article with this one on Khadi; Excerpt:

In the 1980s, when Santosh joined the trust, he also began Hosa Jeevana Daari (a new way of life), a centre for sustainable living alternatives. Santosh regards Masanobu Fukuoka, the author of One-Straw Revolution, as a major influence in his life and this reflects in his outlook towards agriculture in particular, and sustainability as a whole.
Seeing the demand move favourably towards khadi and naturally dyed fabric, Santosh also began the khadi unit. His son Sumanas was home-schooled up to Class VII and then joined a Kannada-medium school. He went on to complete his masters in biodiversity conservation at Oxford and has been working closely with the khadi weaving centre.
The initiatives that the trust is currently into encompasses the interests and expertise of all three generations—a specialized adoption agency, a tree-planting effort with rare native varieties of the area, the centre for sustainable living alternatives that is primarily into environment education and the khadi weaving unit. But it is the last one, with its unique perspective to productivity, which is intriguing.

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